Hey, doc, where is my magic pill?

help with pain

Migraines are unique in the sense that we do often think in the beginning they will be well managed and there is no reason to think otherwise. Likely, we have absolutely No Clue they can develop into chronic migraines. And ignorance is bliss.

And for a bit with episodic migraines they Are well managed. Your pain is controlled. Triptans work well and the migraines are not frequent so certainly, you do not have to worry about rebound headaches, which at the time you likely will also not have heard of.

But as they become more frequent you get in this limbo stage where you start preventatives and use your triptan the max the week. And you Still believe your doctor can help you with your pain. Because these are migraines not chronic pain, right? Surely, they can be managed much easier. No doctor says this is chronic pain and this is no longer easy to manage. And, hell, that would have been a realistic thing to say. Because it is. You can go back down to episodic and then it wouldn’t be chronic pain, unless it was high episodic which has the same impact. But let’s say you went right down to low episodic well then it wouldn’t be chronic pain anymore. But until it does… chronic pain. Until it does, it is complicated.  And because they don’t come out and say it for this limbo period we think this can’t be that bad. It can’t get worse. I’ll take the preventative and it will Substantially improve.

But it doesn’t because no preventative substantially improves anything. Best case 50%, which sounds awesome but is a rare result. And if you are daily, 50% still means chronic. So pretty complicated. You add in vitamins, lifestyle, exercise… and whatever else you need to add it, or try, or try again just to see if something works. Anything works. And at this point, it becomes pretty clear your doctor isn’t going to help much with pain management. And medication alone isn’t going to be the end all of treatment.

In the end, pain is always more complicated than we initially think.

Oska Pulse

So this is a bit of a carry over from my other blog the Brainless Blogger. I was doing a review for the Oska Pulse hoping to see a benefit with fibromyalgia during three months, which I certainly did… but I have also seen improvements with migraines. So I think I should mention it on my migraine blog as well.

What is the Oska Pulse? Well, it is an external stimulation device designed to relieve pain, muscle stiffness and inflammation through pulsed electromagnetic field technology (PEMF). It promotes recovery for all types of pain and is drug-free.

 

Where to purchase? Price?

You can purchase Oska Pulse at OskaWellness.com. The cost is $399. With my Brainless Blogger discount enter BRAIN in the coupon code and get 5% off.

Return policy?

There is a 90-day money-back guarantee.

Benefits:

  • non-drug treatment
  • an external device, so no surgery to implant it.
  • portable and I can bring it with me anywhere anytime
  • It has a band so I can attach it do my shoulder or back or knees as the need may be. Although for migraines I just lay down with it by my head.
  • Chargeable
  • Runs on 30-minute cycles and turns off by itself.

 

Some Research

“Treatment of migraine with pulsing electromagnetic fields” involved 42 subjects had treatment 1 hour a day for 2 weeks. 73% reported decreased headaches (45% a good decreased and 15% and excellent decrease). 10 went on for an additional 2 weeks of treatment. All showing a decrease in headaches (50% good, 38% excellent).

My Results

So it took a bit to see any results in the migraine area. I use it consistently around 7-9 times a day to start for three months and then now down to 5 times a day. On the head area and body. I have had migraines for 20 years so they are pretty ingrained in me, I assume people who are episodic or with a little less time under their belt would see results sooner than I did.

What I am beginning to see is a decrease in intensity. Some decrease in frequency; I am daily but I have, indeed, had migraine free days. But mostly it is the intensity that is what I have noticed. First, it was a delay in the migraine start time… like later in the day. Then just lower intensity. Some days so low I would be hard pressed to call it a migraine without the other obvious migraine symptoms. Instead of my usual 7-9 daily range, it is 4-9, with the hormonal ones being the highest in there as they, as per usual, don’t respond to much of anything.

Secondly, and I can only assume this is because it is helping with intensity, it is also helping with one of my most problematic symptoms of late: relentless persistent nausea. For two years now that nausea has plagued me. I have eaten zofran like candy with gravol. And peppermint tea and ginger. And I lost 25 pounds because I could barely eat and struggled to keep anything down. 25 pounds of weight loss is a lot for someone with hypothyroidism. My doc wasn’t sure it Was the migraines and tested me like nuts for this random weight loss. Anyway, the Oska Pulse knocked it down about 70%. I take about 1 zofran a day or one 12 hour gravol to managed the nausea. It is such a profound relief to be able to manage that now. And eat. And actually have an appetite.

Anyway, it is helping me at work since work always increases pain. Such is life. So instead of hitting really high points and needing a lot of medication to just get through and crashing when I get home, I am more of a mid-range and getting through with little to no medication.

I am on botox, but only the first round and as a previous non-responder I do not respond to the first round and maybe not at all. At my last appointment when it hadn’t done anything yet my doc wasn’t very optimistic. But I am going for another round anyway. So the results I have been getting are unlikely to be that. Also I ran out last month as I am late to get in for the next round, so actually shouldn’t be responding at all at this point. Nevertheless, I believe in all avenues of treatment so I am going to do Both. Other things I currently do for treatment are magnesium oil, B vitamins, ice, Japanese mint oil topically and exercise. Medication: topamax and relpax.